Annie Murphy Paul

Brilliant: The Science of Smart

New research on learning can help us all expand our intelligence

Learning is the master skill, the ability that allows us to realize our ambitions: succeeding in school, getting ahead at work, playing a sport or a musical instrument, speaking a second language. Yet until recently, even the experts didn’t understand how learning works. Now research in cognitive science, psychology and neuroscience is revealing the simple and surprising techniques that can help us learn to be smarter.

img-amp-headshot Annie Murphy Paul is a book author, magazine journalist, consultant and speaker who helps people understand how we learn and how we can do it better. Her latest book, How to Be Brilliant, is forthcoming from Crown.
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Learning Columnist at Time.com • CNN.com • Forbes.com • MindShift.com • PsychologyToday.com • HuffingtonPost.com

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Computational Thinking: How To Get It, and Why It’s Important

A group of children on a playground, each kid clutching a slip of paper with a number on it, moves along a line drawn in chalk, comparing numbers as they go and sorting themselves into ascending order from one to ten. Another group of children, sitting in a circle, passes pieces of fruit—an apple, an orange—from hand to hand until
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Kids Get Enough Tech Outside of School—Shouldn’t the Classroom Offer Them Something Different?

One thousand hours: That’s approximately the number of instructional hours required of U.S. middle school and high school students each year. Four thousand hours: That’s approximately the number of hours of digital media content U.S. youths aged 8 to 18 absorb each year. (If you doubt that’s possible, be sure you’re taking into account the near-universal practice of “media multitasking,”
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The Dumb Jock Stereotype Can Be a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy

Social scientists know that in research studies, minority and female students appear to be vulnerable to the phenomenon called “stereotype threat.” Aware that the group to which they belong is often stereotyped as intellectually inferior, their anxiety that a poor showing on a test will confirm the stereotype actually depresses their performance on the test, creating a self-fulfilling prophecy. Now,
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